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Science and Technology Section (STS): 2020 Elections

STS Publicity Officer Candidate: Ana Torres

Photo of Ana TorresSTS Publicity Officer Candidate: Ana Torres

Assistant Head, Dibner Library
New York University Libraries

 

 

Tell us more about yourself and how you became a librarian.

I grew up in NYC and attended Barnard College majoring in Psychology. While a student at Barnard I worked in different library departments, acquisitions, archives, serials but it was technical services, in particular cataloging,  that I loved.    

 
How long have you been involved in STS and what attracted you to the section?

I can’t believe it!  It’s been about 6 years now.  I’ve been a member of the STS Science Resources: Discovery & Access Committee and I have co-chaired the Program Planning Committee 3 years straight.  I have truly enjoyed my experience in STS, and it’s all due to everyone’s commitment to making STS successful.  

 

In your opinion, what are some of the most interesting topics or trends we’re seeing in science & technology libraries? We are all involved in amazing projects and it’s difficult to just select a few topics.  Personally, I’m interested in embracing IDBE opportunities. Discussions around IDBE are important to the library profession,  but it needs to be integrated at every level and in every specialty.    

 

In terms of technologies, Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, Mix Reality, and Extended Reality are shaping our lives and could well be the biggest impact since the evolution of the Internet.  As it is now, these technologies are advancing gaming, defense, medicine, engineering to name a few. As this field grows science libraries need to expand in support.      

 

What goals for the section would you have if elected to this position? How do you envision committees and members helping the section achieve those goals?

One of the goals is to continue working in unison to achieve the section’s mission.  The role of the Publicity Officer is to communicate information to stakeholders, to make sure information is shared with the right groups and at the right time.  I’m committed to this role but success very much depends on teamwork, relationship building, and collaboration. So I will pay particular attention to those areas.

 

Where do you see STS going in the future? How does it need to change and evolve to stay relevant to science & technology librarians?

The most immediate challenge I see and one that is going to have a long term impact is the scaling down of mId-winter programming.  Change is always a difficult process especially when you are bringing something to an end and at the same time, you are building new programs.  It is important to be intentional, plan ahead, involve all committee members and section members, take into account the time needed to develop and transition, and above all be kind when it seems things are not working out.     

 

Tell us something interesting about yourself that not very many people know.

Many know that I’m crafty.  I knit, crochet, and do some sewing, but many are surprised to hear that I also enjoy woodworking.  I’ve created some small furniture, but my biggest challenges have been house renovations: laying floor, renovating stairs, painting, etc.   

STS Publicity Officer Candidate: Ginny Pannabecker

STS Publicity Officer Candidate: Virginia "Ginny" Pannabecker

Director, Research Collaboration and Engagement

Virginia Tech Libraries

 

Tell us more about yourself and how you became a librarian.

I have always been interested in learning about and researching topics of all types: languages, literature, history, sciences, and more. I've also always had a preference for working collaboratively with others. Working in libraries is great for both of these! I started working in libraries as a student, then staff, then as a librarian. I got into librarianship overall, and science and health sciences librarianship specifically, due to multiple, lucky opportunities to work with thoughtful mentors in these areas.
 

How long have you been involved in STS and what attracted you to the section?

STS has been a wonderful home in ACRL. I joined to get connected to others working in the sciences in libraries and it's continued to be one of the best places to get to know others, follow trends in the community via listservs and events, and participate in professional service activities through the section. I've been a member of STS since about 2012 and a member of the STS Liaison Committee since 2014, becoming a co-chair in 2015. I was also the STS Liaison to the American Institute of Biological Sciences from 2014-2016.
 

In your opinion, what are some of the most interesting topics or trends we’re seeing in science & technology libraries?

Some of the more recent trends or topics that draw my intention are: open science and its connections to information access and research reproducibility; citizen or community-involved science research methods and events; computational methods, such as text and data mining and machine learning techniques; and lab or maker spaces. Connecting to humanities, arts, and social sciences, a couple trends that seem to be coming into science areas as well include: community-based action research that involves impacted communities as partners from the start through the end of a project; narrative-based research methodologies; and the use of virtual and augmented reality for research or for exploration of models.
 

What goals for the section would you have if elected to this position? How do you envision committees and members helping the section achieve those goals?

Considering (with the involvement of committees and members) the communication tools we use as a section and how they contribute to our goal to be a welcoming, equitable, diverse, and inclusive section. Then making changes to work further towards this goal. 

I would reach out to committees and members to be an integral part of this, through sharing what they've learned, results of reports or surveys conducted, such as the recent survey report from the STS Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion taskforce, and through sharing their individual thoughts and ideas.
 

Where do you see STS going in the future? How does it need to change and evolve to stay relevant to science & technology librarians?

The recent move to hold more programming online is essential as it not only offers programming and networking opportunities with less cost for travel and time, it also helps cut down on air travel that many of us in science communities see as a problem in our climate crisis.

More discussions or programming focused on how we are incorporating inclusive practices in our work, teaching, and research, that involve our diverse communities and build equity into our everyday life would be wonderful.

Perhaps more frequent, informal or quick (lightning talk sessions / virtual poster sessions) programming opportunities during the year might allow for different committees and groups, as well as individual members to participate at times of the year that work well for their workflow and increase opportunities for exchanging ideas. Asynchronous events might be another option to consider.
 

Tell us something interesting about yourself that not very many people know.

I love hiking and using the micro lens my oldest daughter gave me for my smartphone camera to take close up photos of lichen and fungi.