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Science and Technology Section (STS): 2019 Elections

STS Member-at-Large Candidate: Kelee Pacion

STS Member-at-Large Candidate: Kelee Pacion

Kelee Pacion
Biology and Environmental Sciences Librarian

Princeton University

Tell us more about yourself and how you became a librarian.

As a child, I was never without a book.  This led to being told that I should become a librarian as I was always reading a book. This was true, however, I have always been attracted to sleuthing out mysteries in information seeking and finding that one perfect resource for whatever need I might have had.  I started working in a public library as a page and it has taken off since then. I have been able to pair my librarian interests with my passion for science and education. The interdisciplinary nature of librarianship is a perfect fit for my curiosity, ability to find, and joy in teaching others how to find information.

How long have you been involved in STS and what attracted you to the section?

I joined the STS Liaison group in 2015 as I was seeking a section that allowed me to work and collaborate with others interested in Science Librarianship.  The section is very open and welcoming, and I love hearing new ideas from members of the larger section. I love the networking opportunities afforded by this section and look forward to continued work on the committees.

 

In your opinion, what are some of the most interesting topics or trends we’re seeing in science & technology libraries?

I think a new trend is for librarians to help work with and support the training of undergraduate and graduate students on the field of science communication, science policy, and the use of social media as a bridge to information. Communication arose from library and information studies, so it makes sense for librarians to be part of this conversation. In addition, I think a new trend is to create sustainable and scaffolded instruction programs to better meet the needs of the budding producers of scientific information.

What goals for the section would you have if elected to this position? How do you envision committees and members helping the section achieve those goals?

My goals are to look for the hidden ideas, or the ways to connect librarians to each other when they are doing complementary work. I like to look outside of the field and bring ideas in to share with the larger group. I envision committees and members being part of the outward looking process and would like to see more sharing across the groups. As a member of the liaison group I did not immediately recognize how I could interact with the other groups within STS until I had the chance to interact during a conference.  I see it as a possible outreach opportunity for myself.

Where do you see STS going in the future? How does it need to change and evolve to stay relevant to science & technology librarians?

I see STS as being more involved in the sciences and the field of science librarianship by creating programming and workshops to support the creation of new ideas.  As part of staying relevan I think STS could create workshops that allow participants to create products, hold shared discussions, and process through their new ideas in a collaborative environment.  Staying relevant means staying adaptable, this leads to the possibility of conducting UX testing to see what the needs are of the larger group and designing events to meet those needs.

Tell us something interesting about yourself that not very many people know.

I think most people who know me know this… but it does surprise a few.   I am addicted to collecting degrees. I have three master’s and the end is not in site!

STS Member-at-Large Candidate: Sarah Jeong

STS Member-at-Large Candidate: Sarah Jeong

Sarah Jeong
Research and Instruction Librarian for Science
Wake Forest University

Tell us more about yourself and how you became a librarian.

I was a biology major and chemistry minor at Duke University. After graduation, I asked to volunteer in a hospital library and was hired as an evening and weekend library clerk and immediately fell in love with my job connecting research to help all patrons. I applied to one library school in my hometown, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, to study with Dr. Beatrice Kovacs who received her doctorate degree from Columbia University. Before I graduated from library school, I was hired by Wake Forest University as Research & Instruction Librarian for Science in 2003, and I’ve worked here ever since. I consider science librarianship to be my calling.

How long have you been involved in STS and what attracted you to the section?

After my first year of working at Wake Forest University, I wanted to meet and learn from other academic science librarians, and my supervisor at the time recommended that I get involved with STS. I emailed the STS Vice Chair/Chair-Elect to volunteer for a committee and was given the opportunity to Co-Chair an STS Discussion Group in 2004. When I went to my first ALA Annual Conference in 2004 in Orlando, the STS Council and members were welcoming, and STS has been my community where I feel I belong ever since.

In your opinion, what are some of the most interesting topics or trends we’re seeing in science & technology libraries?

Some of the most interesting trends are online pedagogy, research metrics, and data science and visualization. I have worked with an eLearning Librarian to convert my face-to-face LIB220 Science Research Sources & Strategies course to a fully online, asynchronous course with grant support from Wake Forest University's Provost Office. The growing trend toward assessment and research metrics is important to clinical and translational science institutes and other institutions. Regarding data visualization, since genetics has become a core course of pre-med curricula across universities, it is vital to keep up-to-date with the bioinformatics tools and software from the National Center of Biotechnology Information.

What goals for the section would you have if elected to this position? How do you envision committees and members helping the section achieve those goals?

If elected as Member-at-Large, my goal for STS is to raise awareness of training opportunities to develop skills in emerging areas of STEM librarianship through improving communication and connections between the Professional Development Committee, Discovery & Access Committee, Information Literacy Committee, Scholarly Communication Committee, and Membership and Recruitment Committee as well as other committees to meet the needs of STS members.

Where do you see STS going in the future? How does it need to change and evolve to stay relevant to science & technology librarians?

My future vision of STS is increasing professional development opportunities for STS members on emerging skills and technologies in science librarianship. Within the large STS membership, there is a wealth of expertise that experienced STEM librarians could share with newer STEM librarians through webinar presentations. When I served on STS Council from 2004-2008, I remember there was a need for more presentation opportunities for STEM librarians. Webinar presentations offers both presentation opportunities and training opportunities on a broader level for those who can’t afford to travel to ALA Annual and ALA Midwinter every year. 

Tell us something interesting about yourself that not very many people know.

I studied at a university marine lab and was inspired to become an oceanographer but I discovered that I have seasickness.