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Science and Technology Section (STS): 2019 Elections

STS Secretary Candidate: Jeanne Hoover

STS Election-Candidate Profile - Secretary

 

Portrait of Jeanne Hoover

Jeanne Hoover

Scholarly Communication Librarian

East Carolina University

 

Tell us more about yourself and how you became a librarian.

I’ve been a librarian for about eight years, first as a science librarian and now as a scholarly communication librarian.  I first became interested in librarianship as an undergraduate. While planning for graduate school, I decided to apply for part-time library positions at Penn State.  I found a position in a science library, which I loved. In graduate school, I decided to keep working in science libraries and focus on academic librarianship. After working in public libraries, I moved to a science librarian position at East Carolina University.  While I loved this position, I also enjoyed working with scholarly communication topics and I eventually moved to scholarly communication. However, I still serve as the liaison librarian to the department of physics.

 

How long have you been involved in STS and what attracted you to the section?

I joined STS when I became a science librarian.  I heard many positive comments from colleagues and mentors about becoming more involved with STS. At my first ALA conference, I really appreciated an STS member helping me navigate the conference on my first day.  I’ve always enjoyed and learned from my experiences with STS. I’ve served on the Membership and Recruitment Committee, Nominating Committee, Conference Planning Committee, and Scholarly Communication Committee.

 

In your opinion, what are some of the most interesting topics or trends we’re seeing in science & technology libraries?
Scientific information literacy is such an important topic right now.  As librarians, we want our users to be able to understand and critically evaluate information.  In the current environment of misinformation, information literacy skills are more important than ever. I’m also excited to see how scholarly communication will intersect with information literacy.


What goals for the section would you have if elected to this position? How do you envision committees and members helping the section achieve those goals?
If elected to the secretary position, I would work to document and disseminate information from STS Council to the section and ACRL.  It’s important to get the section engaged with the goals and issues being discussed. I will also work diligently with other STS committees to ensure that section members have opportunities to provide comments and feedback.


Where do you see STS going in the future? How does it need to change and evolve to stay relevant to science & technology librarians?

I think the key to STS staying relevant is to continue embracing change and identifying ways to support science and technology librarians.  I would also like to see continued collaborations with other sections and an increase in training opportunities based on STS member needs.

 

Tell us something interesting about yourself that not very many people know.

I collect Starbucks mugs whenever I travel someplace new.  I used my San Francisco mug today that I picked up at an ALA conference a few years ago.

STS Secretary Candidate: Fran Rosen

STS Election-Candidate Profile - Secretary

Portrait of Fran Rosen

Fran Rosen
Collection Strategies Librarian
Ferris State University

Tell us more about yourself and how you became a librarian.

My first career was in software design & when I needed to find another path I heard a lot of voices say “be a librarian!” I hadn’t thought much about the future of librarianship and I didn’t know much about possible jobs, but I like good advice. I got hired as Acquisitions Assistant at the Countway Library of Medicine and I earned an MS in Library & Information Science at Simmons. And when I decided to move back to the Midwest I found out that I could get a job as a faculty librarian and contribute to teaching and learning, so here I am.

 

How long have you been involved in STS and what attracted you to the section?

I started being active in STS in 2010, as a member of the STS Liaisons Committee and also a member of the Virtual Participation Task Force. I got to co-chair the Liaisons Committee, and I was co-chair of the Program Planning Committee for the 2017 and 2018 ALA conferences. I’m the library liaison to the College of Engineering Technology at Ferris State and I love working with and learning from all the science and technology librarians in STS. I enjoy committee work when it is guided by common goals and focused on accomplishing useful things, and I’ve gotten to know a lot of wonderful librarians!

 

In your opinion, what are some of the most interesting topics or trends we’re seeing in science & technology libraries?

Since my job title is Collection Strategies Librarian I tend to focus most on the different pieces of scholarly communication. I’m not sure the problem of unsustainable price increases is “interesting” but it certainly is challenging, and I hope that we can find a new way of looking at scholarly publishing and a new way of doing business. I value collaboration but I also think we have to identify when collaboration isn’t possible. I also pay a lot of attention to developments in discovery and access. There’s definitely growing pains, but overall we’re providing huge amounts of scholarly and practical content, sophisticated tools for finding the right content, and working on consistent access across platforms. But that’s not to neglect all the other cool things that are happening in science and technology libraries – like focusing on undergraduate research, finding ways to support inclusivity and change, and connecting theory and practice in makerspaces.

 

What goals for the section would you have if elected to this position? How do you envision committees and members helping the section achieve those goals?

I think a lot of STS goals are ones that will be best accomplished through working with the other sections and the bigger organizations that we’re a part of. I’ll mention three goals, but they inter-relate with each other and with everything else. First, I hope we can identify specific actions and concrete outcomes related to equity, diversity, and inclusion. We need to have challenging conversations that lead to action – and action that acknowledges that all of us need to learn and change. Second, we can be advocates for science, both in the public sphere and in our libraries. Our librarians have done great work with the framework, and we can do more to help students understand their role in scholarship and science/technology. Third, I’d like STS to work to understand the implications of reductions in budgets that lead to fewer librarians working with students. What is the long range impact? And how can we make sure that administrators understand how important our librarians are for student learning and faculty success.

 

Where do you see STS going in the future? How does it need to change and evolve to stay relevant to science & technology librarians?

STS will continue to do great work. I’m sure of that! One big challenge is how to continue to function in our increasingly virtual world. I think we need to bring people together and that’s a challenge when many of us can’t travel to conferences, and when conferences themselves become online-only. Current work like chat-groups, wikis, and shared spaces needs to be supported and popularized. I think one of the biggest challenges is how to open up the process to new librarians; there might be some opportunities to de-centralize. We might find it possible to re-direct some resources to support leaders who can take time to train others and to help create some new forms of organization and participation.

 

Tell us something interesting about yourself that not very many people know.

I do a Study Table with the women’s basketball team at Ferris State University. I love the players, they all work so hard!