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Science and Technology Section (STS): Past Annual & Midwinter Conferences

ACRL Science & Technology Section programming and materials from past conferences.

2021 ALA Annual Research Forum

Research Forum

Thursday, June 17, 2021 at 1pm CT

Location: Online

Recording link: N/A

2020 ALA Annual Research Forum

2019 ALA Annual Research Forum

STS Research Forum 1-2pm Sunday June 23, 2019 @ Washington Hilton, Shaw room

The STS Research Forum showcases three papers on research projects of interest to science and technology librarians. Research projects can be completed or still in process. A commentator will provide substantive feedback on these unpublished works. Time for audience q&a and feedback is also included.

– Sponsored by the STS Research Committee

Drawers, shelves, and boxes full of data: Status of analog life sciences data and solutions for the future

Shannon Farrell, Kristen Mastel, Julie Kelly (University of Minnesota)

 

Research data is a growing focus in academic libraries; however, little attention is given to older data in print. Before research data was produced and preserved in electronic format, lab notebooks, field books, and data sheets were common data formats.

 

For the last three years, we have been investigating if scientific data exists in our University Archives or is hidden in laboratories and centers across campus. The project has focused on agricultural and life sciences’ data. We hoped to identify datasets that can contribute to current conversations around climate change including crop viability and yields, limnology data, and species distribution and abundance.

 

Using an inventory form that we developed, we identified collections in the University Archives that potentially held reusable analog data. We also surveyed faculty in various life sciences fields asking if they possessed analog data, how they are currently storing the materials, what topics and dates the data covers, and their plans for preservation. We additionally wanted to know what their opinions and experiences were around reusing and sharing the analog data.

 

Our work has discovered numerous reusable datasets in Archives and vast amounts of analog data in researchers’ labs and offices across campus. We found that faculty are still using their analog data and yet, are uncertain about their long-term plans for it, including preservation.

 

This work could be adapted to other institutions, including beyond academia, and we hope to collaborate with others to raise awareness among scientists and find large-scale solutions around discoverability and reuse.

A citation analysis of journals publishing research on women in STEM in higher education

Heidi Blackburn and Jason Heppler (University of Nebraska at Omaha)

 

In recent years, the focus on science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education in the United States has had a tremendous impact on the amount of professional literature generated on this topic. Specifically, the recruitment and retention of women in STEM programs by universities has produced hundreds of studies ranging from stereotypes and biases in the classroom to the workplace climate.

 

A citation analysis and data visualization analysis were conducted to determine the major publishers and journals associated with this research area. The research questions posed in this study are as follows:

1.    Who are the major journals publishing literature regarding women in STEM in higher education?

2.    Who are the major publishers associated with these journals?

 

We reviewed a sample of 645 articles published between 2008 and 2018. References tended to be concentrated on a small core set of journals and then scattered over other publications. However, many of these studies expand the theoretical knowledge base of disciplines such as psychology, gender and sexuality studies, education, and sociology. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the research, the studies were often published in social science or humanities journals, making collection development in this area difficult for librarians as relevant resources might be outside the scope of traditional STEM journals and database packages. This paper provides an overview of specific resources where researchers are currently discussing the status of women in STEM in higher education within the literature. The ramifications for STEM librarians and collection development will also be discussed.

2018 ALA Annual Research Forum

STS Research Forum @ Morial Convention Center, Rm. 208

The STS Research Forum showcases three papers on research projects of interest to science and technology librarians (see abstracts at goo.gl/LwdEKQ). Research projects can be completed or still in process. A commentator will provide substantive feedback on these unpublished works. Time for audience q&a and feedback is also included.

– Sponsored by the STS Research Committee

2017 ALA Annual Conference Research Forum

STS Research Forum @ Hilton Chicago, Stevens Center, Salon A-1

Learn about The Cost of Doing Biology, Testing Journal Matching Systems, and Science Database Holdings at ARL and Oberlin Group Academic Libraries in this engaging research forum. Three speakers will present on their research in progress, an expert commentator will provide feedback, and the audience will have time to ask questions as well. For complete descriptions of the research presentations, see this link: goo.gl/fD9sM6

Sponsored by STS Research Committee 

Links to all slides are available here